53. Love means having to say you’re sorry.

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When I was in my 20s, I had already seen a movie called “Love Story.” If you haven’t seen it, I sorry word written by red lipstickdon’t want to give out the tortured plot and conclusion, but I do want to refer to one of the most famous movie quotes of all time: “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” Beyond lame. And actually, I think it’s just the opposite. One thing to keep in mind however, I am a chronic apologizer. You don’t know how many times I’ve bumped a chair with my leg and said, “Sorry.” And then, “Oh, you’re just a chair!” But in real life, I’m probably guilty as well. I apologize profusely when I’m late, when something bad happened to someone that was completely out of my control, when I forget a hair appointment (which I never do – although I did once – just recently and my hairdresser was concerned that something had happened to me), and of course, when I bump into a chair. I looked up the word “sorry” in the dictionary and it says that it’s “used to introduce disappointing or bad news in a polite way.” I thought that was a really great definition. Of course, if someone said, “I’m sorry I slept with your best friend,” that probably wouldn’t cut it. However, I know it means a lot to me when other people apologize for what can appear to be seemingly small things. It does somehow cushion a blow. Even if it’s just rearranging or canceling a set plan or forgetting my birthday (which these days, is just fine with me) or even for being sick (this person was amazingly concerned and considerate), sorry shouldn’t have to be the hardest word. So, contrary to “Love Story,” I think we need be polite to those we love – especially our hairdressers!

Word to the wise: Say “sorry” more often. It can mean a lot even if it seems like whatever you’re apologizing for is no big deal.

When was the last time you apologized and why? Note: If I’m lucky enough to get a book deal, your comments may be published anonymously in the upcoming book, “Wise Before 25, 50 Things Young Women Need to Know.”

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About Eva Finn

Eva Finn is an award-winning marketing copywriter, advertising instructor and life expert. She started the blog, Wise Before 25 so young women can avoid making the same mistakes she did. This blog will become a book of the same title, which will include contributions from readers. She was also published in a book about the subject of hair– the good, bad and the ugly – called, fittingly enough, Hair Pieces, by the Cary Tennis Workshop. As a copywriter for more than 20 years, she has written ads, brochures, direct mail, radio and television for clients that included In-N-Out Burger, Bank of America, Toyota and Ingram Micro. Eva has a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s degree in education. She has taught advertising classes at The Art Institute of California-Orange County and California State University, Fullerton. And she has had plenty of hard knocks from the school of life.

4 responses »

  1. I’m sorry I didn’t read this sooner. See, I’m already taking your very good advice. I couldn’t agree more. Closeness and familiarity isn’t an excuse for bad behavior. In fact, we should be even MORE sorry for hurting those we love. Even in seemingly minor ways. Thanks for the reminder!

  2. This is a great post. It makes me realize that sorry has power and to not use it lightly. Thank you Eva. I’m so not sorry I met you.

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