Category Archives: Relationships

54. Friends with benefits usually doesn’t benefit you.

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54.	Friends with benefits usually doesn’t benefit you.

Perhaps you’ve seen this great fantasy film, no, it’s not “Harry Potter.” The movie is called “Friends with Benefits.” In it, Mila Kunis and Justin Timberlake both claim all they want from each other is sex – that way they will keep everything simple and uncomplicated between them. Then they cross an emotional line (yes, emotions were involved, go figure) and break up. At the end of the movie they get back together and are as happy as can be. No more friends with benefits but now it’s a true, bells are ringing relationship. This is why I refer to this film as a fantasy. Real life never plays out like Hollywood. If you are in a friends with benefits (FWB) relationship, chances are there aren’t many benefits. I’ve been in a few myself – usually after said “friend” and I have broken up. That’s the worst possible friends with benefits scenario by the way, because it will be very difficult for you to be able to move on. And it feels even worse when he’s the one to move on first. But being in this type of relationship, it really doesn’t matter if you’re in it because of a recent break up or you just hooked up with someone and you can’t unhook yourself. Here are five things to keep in mind if you are in a friends with benefit relationship or thinking of starting one:

  1. This man more than likely never will want more from you – even though you may find yourself wanting more from him.
  2. The more time you spend with him, the less time you may have to find someone who wants to be in a real relationship with you.
  3. Even though you tell yourself and your friends that you are open to meeting other people – most likely you’re not.
  4. If you’re following the FWB rulebook – and there are plenty of website and magazine “How To” articles on the subject – don’t expect a gift for your birthday or allow yourself to send him conversational texts during the day. And of course, when you do reach out to him at night, don’t expect an immediate response. (Huffington Post)
  5. According to Psychology Today, “when you’re looking for an FWB arrangement from the start, you’re forcing a new relationship into a box that may not fit, with a label that may misrepresent it.”

Word to the wise: You may as well be dating a married dude. They’re never available either. At least, not in the way you may want them to be.

What do you think about FWB relationships? Note: If I’m lucky enough to get a book deal, your comments may be published anonymously in the upcoming book, “Wise Before 25, 101 Things Young Women Need to Know.”

53. Love means having to say you’re sorry.

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When I was in my 20s, I had already seen a movie called “Love Story.” If you haven’t seen it, I sorry word written by red lipstickdon’t want to give out the tortured plot and conclusion, but I do want to refer to one of the most famous movie quotes of all time: “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” Beyond lame. And actually, I think it’s just the opposite. One thing to keep in mind however, I am a chronic apologizer. You don’t know how many times I’ve bumped a chair with my leg and said, “Sorry.” And then, “Oh, you’re just a chair!” But in real life, I’m probably guilty as well. I apologize profusely when I’m late, when something bad happened to someone that was completely out of my control, when I forget a hair appointment (which I never do – although I did once – just recently and my hairdresser was concerned that something had happened to me), and of course, when I bump into a chair. I looked up the word “sorry” in the dictionary and it says that it’s “used to introduce disappointing or bad news in a polite way.” I thought that was a really great definition. Of course, if someone said, “I’m sorry I slept with your best friend,” that probably wouldn’t cut it. However, I know it means a lot to me when other people apologize for what can appear to be seemingly small things. It does somehow cushion a blow. Even if it’s just rearranging or canceling a set plan or forgetting my birthday (which these days, is just fine with me) or even for being sick (this person was amazingly concerned and considerate), sorry shouldn’t have to be the hardest word. So, contrary to “Love Story,” I think we need be polite to those we love – especially our hairdressers!

Word to the wise: Say “sorry” more often. It can mean a lot even if it seems like whatever you’re apologizing for is no big deal.

When was the last time you apologized and why? Note: If I’m lucky enough to get a book deal, your comments may be published anonymously in the upcoming book, “Wise Before 25, 50 Things Young Women Need to Know.”

51. Meditate to calm your mind and heal your spirit.

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The wounds in our 20s can be many. It’s a time we’re at our most vulnerable and we exposeMeditation ourselves to new friendships, dating and career experiences, while trying to sever ties with our parents. When I think back on my twenties, I wonder how I got out of them alive. One thing I wish I had known more about back then was meditation. All I remember is working three jobs, going to college and getting my heart broken time and time again. I probably would have laughed if someone had said, “Sit in silence for 20 minutes a day and repeat a positive mantra, such as “Love is the only miracle there is.” I think just the thought of sitting alone and being quiet probably is the part that would have scared me to death. Here are some other common fears about meditation:

It takes too much time. 

The most common concern potential meditators express is that they’re afraid they won’t have time to meditate. They think they’re too busy, and that finding even 20 minutes twice a day isn’t possible. This belief in a lack of time really stems from a misunderstanding of the value of meditation. In fact, we can always find 20 minutes for something we believe is important or valuable.

It’s too hard to concentrate. 

Another misconception is that people feel that their minds are just too scattered or too stressed to meditate. In actuality, every engaged and responsible person in the modern world has a somewhat over stimulated and stressed mind. But this nature of the mind to move from one thought to another is in fact the very basis of meditation.

It will make me lose my edge. 

The third most common misconception is that meditation is for people without real problems and responsibilities. They are afraid that meditation will make less effective in dealing with difficult and challenging life situations. There’s the fear that in being relaxed and at peace, they will lose their edge and effectiveness. In fact, meditation prepares us for dynamic activity.

Learn more at: http://www.chopra.com/ccl/3-common-fears-of-new-meditators?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=n%2Fa&utm_content=Newsletter%20150317&utm_campaign=March#sthash.cTLNALSo.dpuf

So as part of my Morning Miracle (See last week’s post: https://wisebefore25.com/2015/03/11/50-become-a-morning-person/), I’m adding meditation to my yoga practice. Because it has many mind and body benefits, which have been scientifically proven. Through meditation you can:

  • Reduce your stress.
  • Lower your blood pressure.
  • Decrease any tension-related pain, such as, tension headaches, ulcers, insomnia, muscle and joint problems.
  • Increase serotonin production to improve your mood and behavior.
  • Improve your immune system.
  • Feel like your da bomb! (A friend of mine said I was never aloud to say “da bomb” again but writing it is different than saying it, right?)

Of course, it does also help to have a mantra. Here are a few popular ones:

  • Ham-Sah” – The Hindu variant, meaning I am THAT.
  • “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” – Gandhi
  • “Every day in every way I’m getting better and better.” – Laura Silva

If you’d like to see some more mantras, check out http://www.finerminds.com/spirituality/mantras-for-meditation/

So, I know we’re all stressed and never more so than now, but if we can find 20 minutes a day to meditate, I think we’ll all be in a better place and those around us will benefit, too.

Word to the wise: Om. Om. Om. Om. Om. Om. One of the easiest mantras ever and if you say it to yourself for 20 minutes, you’ll feel like you can take on the next 20 hours.

Do you meditate? What are some of your favorite mantras? How do you concentrate? Note: If I’m lucky enough to get a book deal, your comments may be published anonymously in the upcoming book, “Wise Before 25, 50 Things Young Women Need to Know.”

50. Become a morning person.

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I am not one. Never have been one. There is probably nothing more that I hate than getting up inrelaxation the morning. Or for that matter, all day. To give you an idea of how I feel about getting out of my warm bed every day, here’s one of my favorite poems, by the brilliant Dorothy Parker called “Inscription for the Ceiling of a Bedroom:”

Daily dawns another day;

I must up, to make my way.

Though I dress and drink and eat,

Move my fingers and my feet,

Learn a little, here and there,

Weep and laugh and sweat and swear,

Hear a song, or watch a stage,

Leave some words upon a page,

Claim a foe, or hail a friend-

Bed awaits me at the end.

 

Though I go in pride and strength,

I’ll come back to bed at length.

Though I walk in blinded woe,

Back to bed I’m bound to go.

High my heart, or bowed my head,

All my days but lead to bed.

Up, and out, and on;

and then
 Ever back to bed again,

Summer, Winter, Spring, and Fall-

I’m a fool to rise at all!

But my strategy of sleeping as late as could just didn’t seem to be getting me anywhere anymore. I was envious of morning people and knew the world secretly envied them, too. I always heard, “Oh morning people get so much more done.” “They’re so productive.” And of course, at the office, who doesn’t love the guy who calls a 7 a.m. meeting? Well, I still probably wouldn’t love that guy.

So here’s what I’m doing and I started today. I found a book called “The Miracle Morning” – http://miraclemorning.com. Here’s an excerpt that really resonated for me:

How you wake up each day and your morning routine (or lack thereof) dramatically affects your levels of success in every single area of your life. Focused, productive, successful mornings generate focused, productive, successful days—which inevitably create a successful life—in the same way that unfocused, unproductive, and mediocre mornings generate unfocused, unproductive, and mediocre days, and ultimately a mediocre quality of life. By simply changing the way you wake up in the morning, you can transform any area of your life, faster than you ever thought possible.

So, I set my iPhone alarm for six a.m. and prayed some good would come of it. I also used a few tips from the book to keep myself going (and some timeframes I’ve assigned for each):

  1. Turn on the lights (30 seconds to a minute, depending on how groggy I am)
  2. Brush teeth and splash cold water on face (Two to five minutes)
  3. Get dressed (Two to five minutes)
  4. Do some yoga or other form of exercise (15 minutes)
  5. Read some inspirational books or quotes (5-10 minutes)
  6. Write something in a journal (5 minutes)
  7. Drink water (ongoing)
  8. Don’t eat right away – it will slow you down (I get up at 6 so I’ll wait until 8)
  9. Work on my blog and/or my YA novel (60 minutes)
  10. Don’t go back to bed (still struggling with this one!) (All day)

And most important, do this for 30 days. Because, it takes 30 days for anything to become habit.

I see that it’s actually getting light out. I’ve enjoyed these moments of quiet repose and the chance to sit down and write without distractions. The day will begin soon enough at 8 a.m. but in the meantime, I’ve got 20 more glorious minutes to work on this post. Am I a morning person yet? I just might be. Who’s in with me?

Word to the wise: The right morning can make your day. Why not give yourself every opportunity to be successful? I encourage you try it.

Are you a morning person? Do you have any secrets and tips to help those of us who aren’t? Note: If I’m lucky enough to get a book deal, your comments may be published anonymously in the upcoming book, “Wise Before 25, 50 Things Young Women Need to Know.”

49. Calling is for men, texting is for teenagers.

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What a stinger from Patti Stanger, a.k.a., “The Millionaire Matchmaker.” If you’ve ever 5d6a3bc5fcddfdebff9891850f78d127_width_640xwatched her show, you could say she’s kind of “old school” when it comes to dating. And mostly, so am I. Because I think in some ways, with women’s liberation, my generation and those that followed me got the short end of the stick. Men think we don’t need them anymore or that they don’t need to pursue us, because many of us will do their job for them. This is especially true in the case of young women. When social media is the norm and everyone is available every minute of every day via text, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapfish, etc., our communications with men become less special and I think we do, too. There was a time when we only had phones, you know the ones that had dials on them? Back then, it was generally easier to discern a man’s level of interest after a date. If you didn’t hear from him for a few days, or let’s say a week, you were fairly sure you wouldn’t hear from him again and said to yourself, “Next!” Today, the lines are so blurred. Even if someone isn’t that interested after a date, you might not know it. Texting breeds a kind of familiarity that if you don’t know someone, shouldn’t be there until you do. And it goes further than that. I’ve seen the most inappropriate texts between husbands and wives arguing over the most major issues in their marriage! It’s a great escape, isn’t it? You don’t have to cancel a date with someone by calling them, you don’t have to get to know someone by spending time with them and you certainly don’t have to be that interested to keep stringing someone along. And most important, you don’t have to talk to anyone!

Here are some more wise thoughts from a fellow blogger on dating in the digital age:

“While it seems more comfortable and convenient to communicate with friends via electronic messaging, it is actually a less effective way to establish a meaningful relationship. Conversations are shortchanged when you rely on texting, because you miss the emotional complexity that takes place in a face to face interaction.” You can read more of her thoughts at http://onceuponastruggle.com/2015/01/26/the-relationship-failure-of-the-digital-age/

Word to the wise: Real men may not eat quiche, but if they like you, they will call. Never forget that your voice is something truly special. And the guy you’re dating should want to hear it.

What do you think about dating in the digital age? Note: If I’m lucky enough to get a book deal, your comments may be published anonymously in the upcoming book, “Wise Before 25, 50 Things Young Women Need to Know.”

46. Resolutions can be daunting. Affirmations are self-empowering.

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It’s New Year’s Eve and no doubt, many of us are thinking about our resolutions for 2015. It’s no New Year's Evesurprise that losing weight tops all of the lists and surveys. As I got to thinking of resolutions of my own (although I stopped calling them “resolutions” years ago) I felt like I had to dig deeper. This year needed to be different. In years past, I’d write a list of goals and generally accomplish them. Last year, I flew by the seat of my pants and just had a few thoughts. One of which, was getting back into and committing to my yoga practice. Without writing it down, I was able to do that and I’m so glad I did. During the last class of this year, one of my favorite instructors imparted her wisdom regarding intentions for the New Year. She said we could make affirmations about what we want in our lives and that even if we made only one – that would be enough. I wondered if there was only one thing that I wanted in my life in 2015 and I had to affirm it, what would it be? I had an immediate idea but wanted to make sure I chose just the right words (yes, I am a writer and probably a bit of a nut). So I went online and found some nifty affirmations. I really enjoyed quite a few of these: https://www.pinterest.com/christieinge/positive-affirmations-for-women/ I actually found one that said what I wanted to affirm in a way that I wanted to say it:

I deserve relationships that thrive.

Here are a few others I thought were worthwhile:

I am willing to have my own back.

I am patient with myself and worthy of all the waiting.

I choose to let go of the OLD so that I can finally start making progress with the NEW path I want to take in my life.

In my 20s, I always celebrated the New Year in a big way and wrote down resolutions that I actually sometimes kept. I think if you’re a young woman today, it helps to think positively and visualize what you see for yourself in the New Year and years ahead. Of course, a great party to celebrate your affirmations doesn’t hurt either! Wishing you all a happy, healthy and successful New Year. Cheers!

Word to the wise: One positive affirmation is worth 10 resolutions. As we say in the ad biz, keep it simple. And if it starts to work for you, why not try a few more?

What is your affirmation for 2015? Note: If I’m lucky enough to get a book deal, your comments may be published anonymously in the upcoming book, “Wise Before 25, 50 Things Young Women Need to Know.”

45. When you gain something, you lose something. When you lose something, you gain something.

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Thanks to ScarJo for this profound bit of wisdom. No wonder she’s one of Barbara Walter’s “10 Most HiResFascinating People of 2014.” Although, I think she was quoting someone else. Needless to say, when I heard it, it hit me hard. I started to think about all the times of loss and gain in my life, including some of the hardest losses in my 20s (like the death of my best friend). But for all I lost, and gained, the balance of life usually seemed to equal everything out. Take this year for example. I lost my job at the end of July. Clearly, losses on that front included steady income, stability, health insurance, paid vacation and retirement benefits. Wow. That’s quite a few hits. But what have I gained? Well, let’s see. There’d be more freedom, time to re-evaluate what I want to be when I grow up (even though I already am), meeting new people and getting out in the world, fear of the unknown (which might not be the worst thing for a planner like me) and knowing who I can, and can’t count on. Another thing that comes to mind is all the times I’ve been in crappy relationships and finally decided to call it quits. Although I cried a lot and missed people who weren’t really all that great, I gained my self-respect, dignity and the knowledge that I deserved better. Loss does seem to be an easier thing to reflect on. Weighing the pros and cons of gain is harder. Who doesn’t feel good when they gain something? So I thought back and remembered how happy I was when I bought my first condo on my own. Woo hoo! That was clearly a big gain, by any standards. But with becoming a homeowner, I was now tied to a mortgage, making and paying for all my own repairs and coughing up property taxes twice a year. However, I am a homeowner and I love it. As this year comes to a close, let me give it up to ScarJo for helping me to think profoundly and deeply about where I am today and how I got here. I hope her borrowed words of wisdom help you as well.

Word to the wise: Now is a great time to reflect on what you’ve lost and gained in 2014 and throughout your life. Yes, it’s the holidays and boy, talk about a time filled with both ends of the spectrum. All the better to analyze and be wise.

What have you lost or gained and which do you think is easier and why? Note: If I’m lucky enough to get a book deal, your comments may be published anonymously in the upcoming book, “Wise Before 25, 50 Things Young Women Need to Know.”